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Fact Or Fake?

Here are some Fake (News) facts to help you identify Fake News!

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Fact Or Fake?

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A 2016 Stanford study says, “More than 80 percent of middle schoolers believed that ‘sponsored content’ (fake news) was a real news story.” Reporter Camila Domonsoke says, “If the children are the future, the future might be very ill-informed.” Because no one wants the future to be “ill-informed,” it is a good idea to be informed.

First, let’s start with the basics. The first rule to identify fake news is making sure the author is reliable, and one can do this by finding other articles by the same author. Also, most authors have a Wikipedia page, so if one does not find the author’s Wikipedia page, he/she should move on to the second rule. Look for facts issued by groups that are known to be true (Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, and other reliable sources). Always make sure that it’s not a ‘fake fact.’ Meaning, it could say that it was a Stanford study, yet, really it’s not even by Stanford. The third rule is to find out when it was published. It is possible it is fake news. For example, one might be reading an article about a celebrity who passed away in 2013, but the celebrity starred in a new movie.
Fake news is terrible for the future, and by being more knowledgeable, the future will hopefully no longer be considered “ill-informed.” If the audience knows what is fake and what is real, than the future will be brighter for everyone.

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Fact Or Fake?