Panther Press

  • December 7Quote of the Day: “Don’t worry about failures. Worry about the chances you miss when you don’t even try.” - Jack Canfield

Mr. Gleason Video Production Speech

Ryan Lee and Noah K.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Film critics and writers live a life full of entertainment, and Parks Junior High is lucky to have an adult that critiques films part time. Film critics give their opinions on a movie, documentary, or any type of film. Film critics must have an objective point of view because critics must give an honest opinion not influenced by their feelings of the director, actors, or any other factor. Mr. Gleason, the critic, came to Mrs. Champlin’s room to talk to the students about what he does and why.

Mr. Gleason is an employee here at Parks Junior High School, and after work, he goes home to write articles, specifically articles about films. He is a part-time writer for the Federalist, The Medium, and other news sites. Mr. Gleason started to write as a hobby and turned that passion into a part-time job. He does not have a degree in writing, but he, impressively, has a master’s degree in philosophy. In Mrs. Champlin’s Video Production class, he came in and talked about what he does, and he also talked about how one should live their live.

Mr. Gleason used an audio book, called “Coddling the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure” by authors Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff, to set up a speech on how the new generation is heading towards an unfortunate future. The “three untruths” are discussed in his speech, and the “three untruths” are emotional reasoning, Us versus Them, and fragility. The book scratches the surface about people’s incorrect attitudes or incorrect actions that influences people.

The first of the “three untruths” is emotional reasoning. People who reason emotionally only follow and trust their gut and instincts. People should trust their instincts, but emotions are complicated, and that can irrationally influence their decisions. This can be a bad thing, because they can change, and people become blinded by their emotions, and their character is affected. Instead of emotionally reasoning, one should have a balance of emotional reasoning and logical reasoning. This way, their decision will be more balanced, and rather than being controlled by solely their own emotions, logical thoughts will be inserted and will help the person make a better decision.

The second “untruth” is us versus them. Whenever there is a conflict or a disagreement, there is only one side claiming the absolute truth an another with the complete and utter lie. This is not true, as there is always a middle ground. In certain debates, such as the debate about the necessity of war, there is no absolute one correct side, and the best solution is somewhere in the middle.

The last “untruth” is fragility, and it claims that whatever doesn’t kill someone makes them weaker. When people go through experiences that doesn’t kill them and they fail, they do not always get weaker by experiencing failure. Some people happen to get weaker, because they let the failure get to them, but others are determined to succeed and learn from their failures. Whether or not the fragility breaks someone is based on their emotions and their drive to succeed. “Anti-Fragility” is the concept of people getting weaker if they are treated like they are weak. For example, if someone is always sheltered by their parents, they will not know how to survive in the “real-world” and cannot live on their own. This is because they were treated like they were weak and they became weak as a consequence.

Mr. Gleason gave a great speech and the whole class learned a lot from him. Everyone should realize that the “three untruths” are lies, and everyone shouldn’t live their lives based on the Three Untruths. The Video Production homeroom shows much appreciation to Mr. Gleason for the inspirational speech.

Ryan Lee, Contributor

Ryan Lee is currently an eighth grader at Parks Junior High.  His favorite subjects are math and science because he finds it interesting.  His hobbies...

Noah K., Editor

Noah Kim is currently a eighth grader attending Journalism at Parks Junior High. He enjoys basketball (even though he is not good at it) and taking care...

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




The Student News Site of D. Russell Parks Junior High School
Mr. Gleason Video Production Speech