Girl Scout Cookies

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Girl Scout Cookies

https://www.flickr.com/photos/hinnosaar/4373634220

https://www.flickr.com/photos/hinnosaar/4373634220

https://www.flickr.com/photos/hinnosaar/4373634220

https://www.flickr.com/photos/hinnosaar/4373634220

Jamie Cho, Opinion Editor

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     Many people all around the United States now enjoy Girl Scout cookies. Over the years, the business has largely grown and become a national favorite. The variety of flavors and cute, bright boxes really demonstrate the energy of Girl Scouts. The history of how Girl Scout cookies began is truly a great one.

     It all started in the early 1900s. Girl Scouts first started by using cookies as a way to raise money for their troop activities. Girl Scout Cookies were made in the kitchens and ovens of Girl Scouts, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. This was five years after Juliette Gordon Low started the Girl Scouts in the United States. The Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project. By the 1920’s, the cookie business was growing. They were packaged in wax paper bags, sealed with a sticker, and sold door to door for 25 to 35 cents per dozen. It was only a simple sugar cookie made by the troops.

     It didn’t end there! In the 1930’s, Girl Scouts of Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The cookies were at a cheap price of 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies. Over the years, they have came out with many flavors. By 1951, they had Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). These flavors were always the core ones but the troops could choose others as wanted.

     Then, by the1980’s, they had four bakers and adorable boxes to contain the cookies. From then on, they continued to commercially grow. In the early 1990s, two licensed bakers supplied local Girl Scout councils with cookies for girls to sell, and by 1998, this number had grown again to three. At this time, cookie varieties were available, including low-fat and sugar-free selections.

     The history of how Girl Scout cookies came to be is a long one but, the Girl Scouts had fun during it. Many people around the United States love this time of year. They can buy cookies from the front of grocery stores, or from their friends and family who are Girl Scouts. Over the years, these Girl Scout Cookies have become an enjoyment and favorite.